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How to quickly check that your home IoT devices are secure

 

 

You’ve spent a good amount of time getting Alexa to properly activate your wireless speakers, living room lights, and smart cam, but is your new IoT setup secure?

BullGuard has a quick and easy tool that can help you find out if there are any basic problems. It’s called the Internet of Things Scanner. The service checks to see if any of your devices are on Shodan, a search engine that lets anyone find Internet of Things devices like cameras, printers, and thermostats that are publicly accessible on the internet. Anything that’s publicly accessible may also be vulnerable to hackers if there are any security flaws in the software that can be exploited.

bullguard3 BullGuard

Using BullGuard’s web app is easy, just land on the website and click Check if I am on Shodan. A few seconds later you should have your answer. If all goes well, you’ll see a result like the one above.

Next, you can click Deep Scan to take a look at devices on your network and see if BullGuard’s scanner can find any security issues. The downside, BullGuard warns, is that a deep scan may cause vulnerable devices to be listed on Shodan. But if it does find any problems, BullGuard says it will offer details on how to secure your vulnerable devices.

The company also has an IoT consumer guide with three basic tips for securing your network that anyone should do regardless of whether they have smart devices at home or not: Set a password on your smartphone, change the default password for your router’s administration features, and change your Wi-Fi network password from the default.

That’s about all there is to BullGuard’s IoT scanner. It’s a simple way to check for any obvious vulnerabilities whenever you add any new devices to your growing collection of smart home devices.

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Ian is an independent writer based in Israel who has never met a tech subject he didn’t like. He primarily covers Windows, PC and gaming hardware, video and music streaming services, social networks, and browsers. When he’s not covering the news he’s working on how-to tips for PC users, or tuning his eGPU setup.

from Macworld http://ift.tt/2jaufFL

 
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How to add SSL Encryption to an Owncloud Server

This post describe how to quickly enable SSL for apache web server under linux or a Raspberry PI.

1- The first step is to create a directory where we will store the encryption certificates:

sudo mkdir /etc/apache2/ssl

2- We will now generate the certicates, for 3 years (1095 days):

sudo openssl req -x509 -nodes -days 1095 -newkey rsa:2048 -out /etc/apache2/ssl/server.crt -keyout /etc/apache2/ssl/server.key

This will generate the following output:

Generating a 2048 bit RSA private key
……………………………………..+++
…………………+++
writing new private key to ‘/etc/apache2/ssl/server.key’
—–
You are about to be asked to enter information that will be incorporated
into your certificate request.
What you are about to enter is what is called a Distinguished Name or a DN.
There are quite a few fields but you can leave some blank
For some fields there will be a default value,
If you enter ‘.’, the field will be left blank.
—–
Country Name (2 letter code) [AU]:US
State or Province Name (full name) [Some-State]:Florida
Locality Name (eg, city) []:Miami
Organization Name (eg, company) [Internet Widgits Pty Ltd]:Whatever Corp
Organizational Unit Name (eg, section) []:IT
Common Name (e.g. server FQDN or YOUR name) []:ssl.yoursite.com
Email Address []:dummyemail@email.com
3- Now we install SSL for Apache:
sudo a2enmod ssl

4- We will edit the default Apache site (sudo nano /etc/apache2/sitesenabled/000defaultssl.conf) and add the following lines:

SSLCertificateFile    /etc/apache2/ssl/server.crt
SSLCertificateKeyFile /etc/apache2/ssl/server.key
5- Restart Apache:
sudo /etc/init.d/apache2 restart
That’s it!

 

 
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AirPort Base Station Firmware Update 7.7.8

Apple released AirPort Base Station Firmware Update 7.7.8 on Tuesday. The update fixes an issue that caused some AirPort Base Stations to disappear from AirPort Utility when Find My Mac is on. It’s specifically for AirPort Extreme and AirPort Time Capsule base stations with 802.11ac.

Apple’s patch notes in full:

“Firmware update 7.7.8 is recommended for all AirPort Extreme and AirPort Time Capsule base stations with 802.11ac. This update addresses an issue that may prevent AirPort base stations from appearing in AirPort Utility when Back to My Mac is enabled.”

https://support.apple.com/kb/DL1901?locale=en_US

 
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